0 comments on “Self Maintenance Tools : Roll Recovery”

Self Maintenance Tools : Roll Recovery

I’m all about staying healthy, and if i have learned anything over my 20 year running career it’s that staying healthy does require some self- maintenance. When I was running professionally, I often got weekly massages because running 100+ miles a week takes it’s toll. Even when I would feel good, the therapist would find things I didn’t know were brewing. Any athlete or avid exerciser knows how important consistency is, and missing time off for an injury is just frustrating.

Getting weekly massages with my busy life just isn’t an option any more. I bought a Roll Recovery years ago and used it religiously during my build up to the 2015 USA Marathon Championships where I ended up winning.  I was putting in some serious work and just made myself come from a run and work on my calves quads, hamstrings and gluts every day. I credit it to getting to the starting line healthy and ready to go.

So whey Roll Recovery over a foam roller? Foam rolling for is helpful and fine, but for me it seems like too much work and to get myself in position. I also did not have enough body weight to really get the pressure I needed. I like the tension the Roll Recover offers and feel I get a more target massage with it. You can roll it back and forth or just hold certain spots for more of acupressure work. I know my legs aren’t hulking, so big dudes, if you are wondering if this will work for you- it will! The springs stretch a little and there is a key where you can adjust the tension as well. If your thighs are size of tree trunks..well try a friend’s first.

If you haven’t tried one, just hit your local running story, and they might have one you can try. I often lend mine out to patients and they are usually sold. It may be more expensive than a foam roller but frankly, it is portable and it works better. As the saying goes, you get what you pay for.

Invest in yourself, and make sure you do the little things to keep your body strong and healthy and ready for what ever fun activity or sport you are into.  Check out more about this great product here at Roll Recovery.

0 comments on “Ankle sprains can have lasting effects”

Ankle sprains can have lasting effects

Ankle Sprains are one of the most common musculoskeletal problem effecting all ages and people of all different activity levels.  There are different locations and several different grades depending on severity, with the high and low lateral ankle sprains being the most common.

We have probably all felt the immediate pain of a “twisted” ankle. Sometimes it subsides, and there is not much bruising or swelling and walking is fine in a few days. Other times, your ankle might turn all kinds of interesting colors and swell up more than you ever thought possible. In more severe cases, weight bearing is not possible, and you are in for a long haul of surgery and rehab.

But even the mildest of sprains can leave you feeling “stiff” with a some loss of range of motion at the ankle joint that can have lasting effects not only for your ankle, but have a domino effect all the way up your leg to your pelvis. Once walking is compromised, you begin to lose calf musculature and become less efficient.  Eventually you can even start to have pelvic alignment issues and muscle inhibition. Severe grade 2 and 3 cases can cause chronic pain, stiffness and proprioceptive issues if left untreated, as often the effect of immobilization are almost as bad as the injury.

So the next time you “twist” your ankle, do yourself a favor and seek medical advice from your doctor and physical therapist to make sure you don’t have any last effects. To get on my soap box,  the RICE principle has been proven to prevent healing and icing is best only if you want to reduce pain.  The British Journal of Sports Medicine, for example, investigated 22 separate studies and concluded that “ice is commonly used after acute muscle strains, but there are no clinical studies of its effectiveness.” A report in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research was even more alarming. Not only does icing fail to help injuries heal, the authors found, it may well delay recovery from injury. Think “ARITA” …Active Recovery Is The Answer. More on that later!

So for acute injuries…avoid ice and NSAIDS and let the body go through the healing stages. Your body is much smarter than you are. Compression and warm baths are best, with some active movement around the compromised area to enhance the lymphatic drainage system.

Grades of ankle sprain severity

Severity Damage to ligaments Symptoms Recovery time
Grade 1 Minimal stretching, no tearing Mild pain, swelling, and tenderness. Usually no bruising. No joint instability. No difficulty bearing weight. 1–3 weeks
Grade 2 Partial tear Moderate pain, swelling, and tenderness. Possible bruising. Mild to moderate joint instability. Some loss of range of motion and function. Pain with weight bearing and walking. 3–6 weeks
Grade 3 Full tear or rupture Severe pain, swelling, tenderness, and bruising. Considerable instability and loss of function and range of motion. Unable to bear weight or walk. Several months
Source: Adapted from Maughan KL, “Ankle Sprain,” UpToDate, version 14.3, and Ivins D, “Acute Ankle Sprain: An Update,” American Family Physician (Nov. 15, 2006), Vol. 74, No. 10, pp. 1714–20.

 

My son wanting his ankle taped:)

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The information, including but not limited to, text, graphics, images and other material contained on this website are for informational purposes only. The purpose of this website is to promote broad consumer understanding and knowledge of various health topics. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health care provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition or treatment and before undertaking a new health care regimen, and never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website.

 

 

 

 

0 comments on “Full-Body Dynamic Warmup”

Full-Body Dynamic Warmup

Get your body ready

The best way to get ready for your workout or sport is to incorporate a dynamic warmup.  The purpose of taking a few minutes beforehand is to stimulate the nervous system, increase body temperature, work on range of motion, flexibility and address any limitations. Getting your joints, muscles and ligaments ready to start taking load and speed is necessary for optimal performance and will also help decrease your risk of injury.

0 comments on “Perfecting the Hip Hinge”

Perfecting the Hip Hinge

The Hip Hinge:

The hip hinge is a fundamental movement that all humans should know how to do. It is the backbone for all athletic movements as there is no way to jump, land, change directions or train power without being able to get in this position. Spinal bending (flexion) is fine for certain motions like tying your shoes, but not for movements that require a greater load or more explosion.