0 comments on “Self Maintenance Tools : Roll Recovery”

Self Maintenance Tools : Roll Recovery

I’m all about staying healthy, and if i have learned anything over my 20 year running career it’s that staying healthy does require some self- maintenance. When I was running professionally, I often got weekly massages because running 100+ miles a week takes it’s toll. Even when I would feel good, the therapist would find things I didn’t know were brewing. Any athlete or avid exerciser knows how important consistency is, and missing time off for an injury is just frustrating.

Getting weekly massages with my busy life just isn’t an option any more. I bought a Roll Recovery years ago and used it religiously during my build up to the 2015 USA Marathon Championships where I ended up winning.  I was putting in some serious work and just made myself come from a run and work on my calves quads, hamstrings and gluts every day. I credit it to getting to the starting line healthy and ready to go.

So whey Roll Recovery over a foam roller? Foam rolling for is helpful and fine, but for me it seems like too much work and to get myself in position. I also did not have enough body weight to really get the pressure I needed. I like the tension the Roll Recover offers and feel I get a more target massage with it. You can roll it back and forth or just hold certain spots for more of acupressure work. I know my legs aren’t hulking, so big dudes, if you are wondering if this will work for you- it will! The springs stretch a little and there is a key where you can adjust the tension as well. If your thighs are size of tree trunks..well try a friend’s first.

If you haven’t tried one, just hit your local running story, and they might have one you can try. I often lend mine out to patients and they are usually sold. It may be more expensive than a foam roller but frankly, it is portable and it works better. As the saying goes, you get what you pay for.

Invest in yourself, and make sure you do the little things to keep your body strong and healthy and ready for what ever fun activity or sport you are into.  Check out more about this great product here at Roll Recovery.

0 comments on “To foam roll or not to foam roll?”

To foam roll or not to foam roll?

There are so many things out there for recovery, it’s easy to get over-whelmed. I admit the roller is not my go-to tool mainly because any time I sit on the floor, my 4 year old decides to sit on me. But, doing some sort of stretching or body work after you have run or worked out is a good thing for muscle fiber health. Rolling has not been proven to give any lasting effects more than a few hours afterwards, but combined with some active movements or trigger point pressure, it’s been shown to be beneficial. It’s probably even best to cut your run a few minutes short if you are pressed for time and allow a few minutes of stretched to elongate the muscles that are prone to tightness so you will feel better on your next run or workout.

Your quadriceps (front thigh), hamstrings (back of thigh) certainly take a beating with any workout. Foam rolling is a great way to address these using your body weight. You can literally roll on it to work these muscles, stopping at any tender spots or trigger points and holding at least 30 seconds. The breathing is important, so take at least 2 deep breaths in and out slowly to send a signal to your brain to relax.

Also, roll with some active movements. For instance, in the below photo I am rolling my adductor (inner thigh) muscles. The longest one (Adductor Magnus) crosses the knee, so adding some knee bending and straightening while holding in the same spot is good for increasing tissue and fascial glide.

If you don’t work your mobility on a daily basis you will slowly loose it. So what, you say? Well, tight hip flexors mean your stride is shorter and can alter your alignment leading to back pain, tight pectoralis muscles (chest muscles) mean your posture changes and your shoulder joint is not as efficient, tight calves effect your ankle mobility and ability to squat to name a few. So, take the time to do a few minutes a day of something. Your body will thank you by feeling better on your next workout. I generally do a few minutes after a run, then about 10-15 minutes before bed. What is your favorite recovery tool?