0 comments on “Pain with Downhill Running”

Pain with Downhill Running

Oh my knees!

If you do a lot of running, you’ve probably experienced some sort of knee pain at one point or another. There can be lots of reasons why your knees hurt…Soft tissue restrictions, joint irritation, spinal alignment, or strength and stability to name a few. Often it may be a hip or ankle issue that is contributing to your pain. It’s a good idea to get your whole body checked out and even assess your running form to make sure you address the route of the problem rather than the site of the pain.

If I find a patient has a stability issue, a good exercise to begin with is a mini squat with your heel elevated. Having your feet in an elevated position will mimic the position your foot is in as you are running downhill. I like to start patients with both heels elevated and have them bend to about 20 degrees (or in a pain-free range). Start first with 2 sets of 15-20 daily, then progress to 1 leg at a time to make it more challenging. Running is an endurance sport, so higher reps with good form are key.

As always, consult your Primary Care Physician with any conditions you are concerned about and exercise in a pain-free range.

 

 

0 comments on “What is “W sitting” and why is it bad for your children?”

What is “W sitting” and why is it bad for your children?

Recently I have been treating a lot of high school patients with hip and knee pain during sports activities, and in more than one case the underlying cause is probably a long history of “W sitting” which is demonstrated in the above photo. I would always correct my children when they got in this position because I know that it can have some serious long-term risks for their developing bodies like the following:

0 comments on “To foam roll or not to foam roll?”

To foam roll or not to foam roll?

There are so many things out there for recovery, it’s easy to get over-whelmed. I admit the roller is not my go-to tool mainly because any time I sit on the floor, my 4 year old decides to sit on me. But, doing some sort of stretching or body work after you have run or worked out is a good thing for muscle fiber health. Rolling has not been proven to give any lasting effects more than a few hours afterwards, but combined with some active movements or trigger point pressure, it’s been shown to be beneficial. It’s probably even best to cut your run a few minutes short if you are pressed for time and allow a few minutes of stretched to elongate the muscles that are prone to tightness so you will feel better on your next run or workout.

Your quadriceps (front thigh), hamstrings (back of thigh) certainly take a beating with any workout. Foam rolling is a great way to address these using your body weight. You can literally roll on it to work these muscles, stopping at any tender spots or trigger points and holding at least 30 seconds. The breathing is important, so take at least 2 deep breaths in and out slowly to send a signal to your brain to relax.

Also, roll with some active movements. For instance, in the below photo I am rolling my adductor (inner thigh) muscles. The longest one (Adductor Magnus) crosses the knee, so adding some knee bending and straightening while holding in the same spot is good for increasing tissue and fascial glide.

If you don’t work your mobility on a daily basis you will slowly loose it. So what, you say? Well, tight hip flexors mean your stride is shorter and can alter your alignment leading to back pain, tight pectoralis muscles (chest muscles) mean your posture changes and your shoulder joint is not as efficient, tight calves effect your ankle mobility and ability to squat to name a few. So, take the time to do a few minutes a day of something. Your body will thank you by feeling better on your next workout. I generally do a few minutes after a run, then about 10-15 minutes before bed. What is your favorite recovery tool?

0 comments on “Can you squat?”

Can you squat?

Our bodies are born mobile, and it’s not until we stop using certain positions that we loose our ability to get in them. Often its sedentary life style, desk jobs, and sitting in cars that slowly robs us of our mobility. Even sports, strength training and our workouts can leave us limited if we don’t constantly work areas that are prone to tightness.

The squat test is a great movement to tell you how well somebody’s body is moving, particularly if you have your arms overhead as you are doing it. A simple quick squat test can tell you some much about the movement quality of someone’s spine, shoulders, hips, and ankle joints and even assess their body control.

Why is important to stay mobile? Because the body is smart, and losing mobility in one area will cause it to find it in another often resulting in an injury. Also, less mobile areas mean other areas work harder and your body is not as efficient. For example, not being able to get low enough to lift something heavy with your legs, means you might round your back and be prone to an injury. Or another example, have a shortened Latissimus muslce (back muscle)  or poor thoracic mobility can effect your shoulder in over-head range of motion leading to pain and inefficient over-head activities. Even being able to get into a good squat is vital for explosive jumping in sports.

The good new is it might take a little time, but you can get your mobility back. Through some functional movement assessment, joint mobilizations, tissue release and corrective exercises, you can increase your mobility and retrain your brain to use your body the way you did as a kid.

Here is an example of good squatting mechanics with hips below knees, knees over toes, torso upright with arms overhead. Can you get in this position?