It’s your journey, don’t let pain stop you.

Often the only thing that gets patients to finally call their doctor or come to a physical therapist is pain. Wether it’s acute or chronic, your body is telling you something is not right. Often this pain starts limiting you from doing the things you love or even just completing simple daily tasks. Getting to the root of your pain is the key to resolving it completely.

Taking care of you

We are certainly in a weird, unexpected time with this new Covid 19 pandemic. Everyone is on edge and anxious with the uncertainty and life disruptions, understandably so.

Just the other day I had a patient call me saying they were feeling very anxious and depressed and thought they needed to talk to somebody on the phone. Since it was late, I directed her to call a suicide prevention number until she could connect with her primary medical doctor, and followed up with her family. Here are some helpful numbers if you or anyone you knows needs help. (CDC link)

Staying cool in the summer

I admit that one reason I love training on the Monterey Peninsula is because the weather is perfect for running. But being a North Carolinian, I do love the humidity, and I make lots of east coast trips where you have to run in stifling heat and feel like your head is going to explode.

Self Neck Mobilization

Ever wake up with neck pain or do a funny movement and feel your neck immediately kink up? Ever look down at a computer or a book for hours and feel the onset of neck pain? Have headaches? I have a feeling we have all been there and suffered for a few days until you were slowly able to regain some motion and have less pain and not walk around like a stiff robot. I had a surgeon the other day tell me he was hovered over a patient for 6 hours and his neck just hadn’t been the same even though he has been doing the same motion for years. I always tell patients you can do strenuous things and ask a lot of your body until one day it will tell you that it has had enough.

Ankle sprains can have lasting effects

Ankle Sprains are one of the most common musculoskeletal problem effecting all ages and people of all different activity levels.  There are different locations and several different grades depending on severity, with the high and low lateral ankle sprains being the most common.

We have probably all felt the immediate pain of a “twisted” ankle. Sometimes it subsides, and there is not much bruising or swelling and walking is fine in a few days.

Make your health a priority

What can On Track Physical Therapy do for you?

Get you information: I often get calls from patients that have a new pain or issue and want to get some information and a thorough medical evaluation. Many of my patients do not have a primary care doctor, so starting with a physical therapist is a great way to get into the health care system. I am embarrassed to admit, I don’t even have a primary doctor. The good news is, physical therapist are highly trained in orthopedics, neuro and everything in between. Though On Track Physical Therapy specialized in general orthopedic issues, we see clients with all diagnoses including post -surgical and vestibular to name a few.

What is “W sitting” and why is it bad for your children?

Recently I have been treating a lot of high school patients with hip and knee pain during sports activities, and in more than one case the underlying cause is probably a long history of “W sitting” which is demonstrated in the above photo. I would always correct my children when they got in this position because I know that it can have some serious long-term risks for their developing bodies like the following:

To foam roll or not to foam roll?

There are so many things out there for recovery, it’s easy to get over-whelmed. I admit the roller is not my go-to tool mainly because any time I sit on the floor, my 4 year old decides to sit on me. But, doing some sort of stretching or body work after you have run or worked out is a good thing for muscle fiber health. Rolling has not been proven to give any lasting effects more than a few hours afterwards, but combined with some active movements or trigger point pressure, it’s been shown to be beneficial. It’s probably even best to cut your run a few minutes short if you are pressed for time and allow a few minutes of stretched to elongate the muscles that are prone to tightness so you will feel better on your next run or workout.

Your quadriceps (front thigh), hamstrings (back of thigh) certainly take a beating with any workout. Foam rolling is a great way to address these using your body weight. You can literally roll on it to work these muscles, stopping at any tender spots or trigger points and holding at least 30 seconds. The breathing is important, so take at least 2 deep breaths in and out slowly to send a signal to your brain to relax.

Also, roll with some active movements. For instance, in the below photo I am rolling my adductor (inner thigh) muscles. The longest one (Adductor Magnus) crosses the knee, so adding some knee bending and straightening while holding in the same spot is good for increasing tissue and fascial glide.

If you don’t work your mobility on a daily basis you will slowly loose it. So what, you say? Well, tight hip flexors mean your stride is shorter and can alter your alignment leading to back pain, tight pectoralis muscles (chest muscles) mean your posture changes and your shoulder joint is not as efficient, tight calves effect your ankle mobility and ability to squat to name a few. So, take the time to do a few minutes a day of something. Your body will thank you by feeling better on your next workout. I generally do a few minutes after a run, then about 10-15 minutes before bed. What is your favorite recovery tool?

Can you squat?

Our bodies are born mobile, and it’s not until we stop using certain positions that we loose our ability to get in them. Often its sedentary life style, desk jobs, and sitting in cars that slowly robs us of our mobility. Even sports, strength training and our workouts can leave us limited if we don’t constantly work areas that are prone to tightness.

The squat test is a great movement to tell you how well somebody’s body is moving, particularly if you have your arms overhead as you are doing it. A simple quick squat test can tell you some much about the movement quality of someone’s spine, shoulders, hips, and ankle joints and even assess their body control.

Why is important to stay mobile? Because the body is smart, and losing mobility in one area will cause it to find it in another often resulting in an injury. Also, less mobile areas mean other areas work harder and your body is not as efficient. For example, not being able to get low enough to lift something heavy with your legs, means you might round your back and be prone to an injury. Or another example, have a shortened Latissimus muslce (back muscle)  or poor thoracic mobility can effect your shoulder in over-head range of motion leading to pain and inefficient over-head activities. Even being able to get into a good squat is vital for explosive jumping in sports.

The good new is it might take a little time, but you can get your mobility back. Through some functional movement assessment, joint mobilizations, tissue release and corrective exercises, you can increase your mobility and retrain your brain to use your body the way you did as a kid.

Here is an example of good squatting mechanics with hips below knees, knees over toes, torso upright with arms overhead. Can you get in this position?